How to Make the Best Cold-Brewed Coffee Using the Smart KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker

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I have tasted cold-brewed coffee at different coffee shops in Scandinavia and around the world, but I had never made it myself at home – until now. The hot Norwegian summer we enjoyed this year, prompted me to finally make my own. One reason for the delay is because I often found the flavor of cold brew to be too bitter, and thus, for long, I thought that cold-brewed coffee was inferior to regular hot brew. But as always with coffee, it comes down to several factors. First of all, you need good quality coffee beans, preferably ones that have been roasted within a few weeks. Second, get a grinder so that you can use freshly-ground coffee every time. Personally, I prefer the Commandante hand grinder made by German engineers, but if you can’t be bothered with the extra workout, I can recommend the electrical one from Wilfa. Third, use clean, cold water. Of course, everyone knows that Norwegian water is the absolute purest in the world. Last but not least, follow the recipe that I provide below.

Use good quality coffee, like this Kenyan roast from Stockfleths, and always freshly ground beans.
Use good quality coffee, like this Kenyan roast from Stockfleths, and always freshly ground beans.

How to Make the Best Cold-Brewed Coffee

Rory Rosenberg from Oslo Cold Brew makes Stockfleths‘ cold brew coffee which they sell in their stores. He was kind enough to share his recipe with me as well. Cold-brewed coffee gets another flavor profile than hot-brewed coffee. Usually, the taste is sweeter, like tropical fruits. That’s why fresh and fruity coffees are recommended, typically from Kenya or Ethiopia. For this specific batch, I used Stockfleths’ Ngugu-ini coffee from Kenya. This is the recipe on how to make the best cold-brewed coffee:

  • 60 grams of coffee per liter water, coarsely ground (similar to French press)
  • Store in a cool room, ideally 12 degrees, or the fridge
  • 18 hours of brewing time
  • Sifted through a steel filter
  • Ideally re-sifted through a paper filter
60 grams of coffee per 1 liter of water
60 grams of coffee per 1 liter of water

Using the Smart KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker

Having a KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker makes cold-brewing so much easier and fun. The equipment works both as your brewing station and the storage container that you keep in the fridge afterward for easy re-filling of your cup every morning. Since the KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker has a steel filter inside, you can just ground the coffee, place it inside, pour over the right amount of water, put the lid back on, and wait. I stored mine in the fridge overnight for the recommended 18 hours, since I didn’t have a cool enough room. That worked fine. The next day, I re-sifted the coffee through a regular V60 coffee filter (remember to rinse it first) and poured it back into the KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker. The taste was surprisingly clean, sweet, and with no traces of bitterness. I think it will be a while until I hot brew again. Perhaps, when winter is coming.

The KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker is both your brewing station and the storage container
The KitchenAid Cold Brew Maker is both your brewing station and the storage container
Cold-brewed coffee ready to be enjoyed
Cold-brewed coffee ready to be enjoyed

How to Make the Best Cold-Brewed Coffee

Do you prefer hot- or cold-brewed coffee? Please share in a comment below.

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Anders Husa

I am Anders Husa – a foodie living in Oslo. I eat at the best restaurants in Oslo, Copenhagen, Stockholm and the major food destinations in the world. I share my foodie stories here.

2 comments

  • I read somewhere that you want to avoid oxygen in your cold brew to avoid oxydation (which turns the coffee sour).
    My cheap solution: just make the cold brew coffee in an empty wine bottle and use a vacuum stopper (e.g le creuset type) on it such that you can easily pump out the air. After 12-18 hrs: filter it through a coffee filter, then back into a clean wine bottle. Again use the vacuum stopper to remove air and prevent oxydation. Easy and simple to store in the fridge. Just like a bottle of wine.

    • Interesting! Would be fun to try. Although, I didn’t experience any oxidation or sourness in the coffee. Perhaps that depends on the quality of the roast as well.

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