How to Make Pasta at Home Egg Ravioli Made Easy With KitchenAid

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Making fresh pasta at home is actually quite easy, especially if you have a KitchenAid stand mixer with the pasta maker attachment. When Kaitlin visited me in Oslo recently, I had to make her homemade pasta, because she is a total Italophile. I found an old recipe that my dad an I made together once – egg ravioli. Fresh pasta filled with ricotta cheese and egg yolks, topped with browned butter and toasted almonds! You can also use black truffle for this recipe, but, unfortunately, I couldn’t get hold of any in Oslo at the moment.

The KitchenAid stand mixer in Satin Copper color
The KitchenAid stand mixer in Satin Copper color

How to Make Pasta at Home

Now, if you don’t have a KitchenAid, fear not, I will explain the old-school Italian mama method too. But judging from my advent calendar giveaways in December, a lot of you guys love the KitchenAid brand, at least. My KitchenAid post became the most liked and commented on my Instagram since I started the account in 2011 … Nothing has created more engagement!

 

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Pasta Dough Recipe

  • 400 g flour – Tipo 0 (preferably) or Tipo 00
  • 4 large eggs

Could a recipe be any simpler?

Pasta made the old-school way
Pasta made the old-school way

How to Make Pasta at Home With a KitchenAid Stand Mixer

If you have a KitchenAid stand mixer at home, simply add 80% of the flour to the bowl and turn the machine on at low speed using the dough hook as the attachment. Start adding one and one egg (yes, the whole egg – whites and yolk) until all eggs are mixed in. Is the dough still sticky in the end? Add more flour until it becomes a smooth dough, but not dry. Leave to knead for about 10-12 mins. If needed, work the dough smoother with your hands afterward. Cover the dough in food wrapping and leave in the fridge to rest for at least 30 minutes. It can stay overnight.

Mix the eggs until they are well-incorporated with the flour
Mix the eggs until they are well-incorporated with the flour

How to Make Pasta at Home By Hand

Pour the flour in a pile on your kitchen counter. Using your hands, dig a little hole in the middle as if it was a volcano opening. Crack all the eggs into this hole. Using a fork, slowly whisk the eggs together with the flour until it is well incorporated. At this point, it looks a bit like eggnog or egg batter. Keep pulling more flour from the walls until the batter starts to resemble a dough. Once it’s firm enough, get in there with your hands and start kneading. Add more flour as needed to make sure the dough doesn’t stick to your hands or the counter. Remember, you don’t have to use all the flour since we are using highly inaccurate measurements here. Eggs vary in size, flour differs in density, temperature plays a role, and so forth. Eventually, what you are looking for is a smooth and elastic ball without any air bubbles. Cover the dough in food wrapping and leave in the fridge to rest for at least 30 minutes. It can stay overnight.

This is how your pasta dough should look
This is how your pasta dough should look
Kaitlin demonstrates the ease of making pasta with the KitchenAid
Kaitlin demonstrates the ease of making pasta with the KitchenAid

Egg Ravioli Recipe

  • Homemade pasta dough (see recipe above)
  • 8 egg yolks + 1 egg for egg wash
  • 250 g fresh ricotta cheese
  • 2 tbsp parmesan cheese (grated)
  • 1 tbsp flat parsley (finely chopped)
  • 1 tbsp fresh mint (finely chopped)
  • 1 pinch nutmeg (freshly grated)
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Start by making the ricotta mix. Mix ricotta, parmesan, herbs, spices, and lemon zest. Taste to perfection with salt and pepper. Refrigerate. Meanwhile, crack the 8 eggs and separate whites from yolks. Save the whites to make scrambled eggs or meringue later (I hate food waste). Refrigerate the yolks until you need them.

Now, fetch the pasta dough from the fridge. Work the dough back to room temperature again and divide it into 8 equally sized portions. Keep whatever parts of the dough you’re not working on under food wrapping or a kitchen towel to prevent from drying. Using the pasta maker attachment for the KitchenAid, or a similar counter-top pasta roller, start to roll the pasta sheets for the ravioli. It’s nice with some assistance at this point.

Egg ravioli in the making
Egg ravioli in the making

Start with the thickest setting (1), roll the dough, fold it, and roll again. You do this a few times to strengthen the gluten in the dough. Then you change the setting to thinner (2) and thinner (3) until your pasta is as thin as you’d like it, smooth, but still manageable. Setting 5 on the KitchenAid should do the trick for ravioli. Make nice sheets of 20 x 10 cm – one for each ravioli (ignore the photo above, it’s easier to make them one by one).

Using a piping bag, make a circle of the ricotta mixture on one side of your pasta sheet. Leave about 2 centimeters for the edge. Place an egg yolk inside the circle. Whisk together an egg wash and brush 2 cm on all sides of the pasta sheet. This will help glue the dough together. Fold one side over the other to make a square ravioli of roughly 10 x 10 cm with the ricotta and egg yolk inside. Gently, press the dough together and make sure all air is let out. Use a fork to make a pattern in the edge, which further helps glue the dough together. Boil in salted water for 3 minutes.

Finished egg ravioli
Finished egg ravioli
Proud pasta maker
Proud pasta maker

You can top these egg ravioli with a lot of tasty stuff. I like to chop and toast almonds, brown some butter, and combine this with grated parmesan cheese! Truffle is also great during the right season if you can find it.

Egg ravioli with browned butter, toasted almonds & parmesan
Egg ravioli with browned butter, toasted almonds & parmesan

What is your favorite homemade pasta dish? Feel free to share in a comment below.

Disclaimer

This is paid promotion for KitchenAid.

Anders Husa

I am Anders Husa – a foodie living in Oslo. I eat at the best restaurants in Oslo, Copenhagen, Stockholm and the major food destinations in the world. I share my foodie stories here.

2 comments

  • Thanks for the great recipe! Where can I buy tipo 0 or tipo 00 flour from in Oslo? Is it the same as double 00 flour used in Italian recipes?

    • Hi Andrea. My pleasure! You can get tipo 0 and 00 flour at most specialty shops in Oslo. E.g. Gutta på Haugen and Via Italia at Mathallen, but also some of the grocery stores with a larger assortment. Yes, it is the same as double 00 used in Italian recipes 🙂

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