Nabo Reap the Benefits of the Michelin-Starred Neighbor (Closed Permanently)

Please welcome the new neighbor – or Kadeau’s neighbor to be precise. Do you remember restaurant Eldorado that opened in November last year? I called it an instant new favorite in Copenhagen. Well, the Kadeau-guys decided to shut it down. Not because it wasn’t going well, though. In fact, Eldorado was going great, and was even awarded “Bistro of the Year” and “Best New Restaurant.” However, the concept didn’t turn out as Rasmus Kofoed, Nicolai Nørregaard and Magnus Høegh Kofoed had imagined. It wasn’t the right next-door neighbor of their flagship in Wildersgade 10 – the one Michelin-starred restaurant Kadeau. Eldorado might reopen in a different location, where it can cater to a younger crowd in search of a quick meal before they continue their urban adventure. Nabo, on the other hand, needs to be there for the neighborhood – serving breakfast, coffee, lunch, wine and dinner.

Great view to the kitchen if you sit in the bar
Great view to the kitchen if you sit in the bar

The christianshavn-Bornholmian casual neighborhood joint

The first thing you’ll notice at Nabo is the door that’s always open. As opposed to Kadeau where the door is locked, without any windows or even a door handle, and you have to ring the bell to be let in. Perhaps a symbol of the exclusivity of Kadeau, while Nabo is open for everyone that passes by. I should add, though, that once you enter Kadeau there will be absolutely no lack of hospitality. At Nabo you’ll meet at more relaxed service level and proper Christianshavn-Bornholmian “hygge”. I was happy to see a familiar face as I entered through the newly refurbished doorway of Nabo. René Renissen was there to welcome me, just like he did at Eldorado a few months ago. It was late and I dined alone, so I asked for a seat in the bar this time as well.

Reaping the benefits of a Michelin-starred neighbor

Renissen popped a bottle of “Opok” – the same great wine I enjoyed at Eldorado in January. I browsed the menu. The Asian-Nordic fushion was clearly gone, and replaced by just Nordic, or should I say Nordic-Bornholmian? Two set menus were offered at DKK 500 each, with one option focused on fish and the other on meat. I told René I wanted to go by the à la carte menu and asked for his recommendations. He suggested the caviar, sweetbreads and baked plums, which happened to be the exact three dishes that had caught my eye. What an easy choice! Most starters are priced at DKK 100, main dishes around DKK 200 and desserts cost roughly DKK 100. Within minutes I was served the amazing crispy crust bread they used to have at the old Kadeau (and Eldorado), and a snack of dehydrated beetroot with a yeast emulsion topped with shavings of beef heart. Lo and behold, if it wasn’t one of my favorite Kadeau snacks! That’s one of the best perks of dining at the sister of a Michelin-starred restaurant: you get to reap the benefits of their experience, produce and even some of their dishes.

Baerii caviar, fermented potato bread & horseradish blanquette
Baerii caviar, fermented potato bread & horseradish blanquette

Lentils are not better than caviar

The fermented potato bread with Baaerri caviar was the more expensive starter, of course. About 125% more pricey than the other options, but still, DKK 245 for that huge chunk of caviar is not a bad price at all in my eyes. Siberian sturgeon caviar is so rich, fatty, sticky and salty, that you can’t really compare it to anything else. Sorry, Massimo Bottura at Osteria Francescana, but lentils are not better than caviar, even if you named a dish so. The fermented potato bread was thinner than the classic one at Amass, and reminded me more of the old naan-bread at Eldorado. Heavy, buttery and slightly gluey when you tear it, just the way you want it. I only wished the horseradish blanquette was swapped with something more sour and mild, like the fresh cheese Nýr.

Same awesome place, new menu and wrapping

Huge sweetbreads of great quality, a velvety soft caramelized cauliflower puree, acicid pickled onions and Bornholmian mustard was hiding underneat red amaranth leaves sprayed with a walnut oil. Does this sound like your every day bistro? No? That’s because it’s not. René suggested I pair it with a glass of 2015 Les Ardilles, which is a mix of pinot noir and gamay grapes. Pefect! My two favorite red wine grapes. Meanwhile, head chef Nicolai Nørregaard had gone to the trouble of leaving his station at Kadeau next door to say hi to me, since head chef Theis Brydegaard was not at work this evening. “What have you actually changed in here?” I asked. “Well, not that much, to be frank,” Nicolai laughed. “We painted the walls white, swapped to light wood tables and generally made it look more Bornholmian, homely and cosy. The head chef is the same and so is the rest of the kitchen.” He confirmed my suspicions.

New interior design. White painted, light wood and carpets
New interior design. White painted, light wood and carpets

Another FAvorite to return to in copenhagen

My short, but sweet visit to Nabo ended with a simple, yet carefully designed dessert of baked plums. A scoop of delicious ice cream flavored with pineappleweed was the perfect contrast to the warm and sweet fruits. Pieces of caramelized white chocolate supplied a crunchy texture in addition to a wonderful taste. Lastly, the acidity of the fermented plum juice that was poured over complemented the otherwise rich dish and gave even more depth in flavors. Walking home from Nabo in the autumn rain, luckily headed for a bath in my D’Angleterre suite, I thought to myself that Nabo was a good replacement for Eldorado. The Kadeau guys have done it again, and their particular Bornholmian flavors and style was highly present. Unlike their recently opened “luxury canteen” Honey, where it was hardly recognisable. Nabo is another favorite of mine in Copenhagen that I will return to.

Baked plums, pineappleweed ice cream, caramelized white chocolate & fermented juice
Baked plums, pineappleweed ice cream, caramelized white chocolate & fermented juice

Have you been to both Eldorado and Nabo? Which concept did you prefer?

Please note: This restaurant has closed permanently.

Lagre

Lagre

Lagre

Lagre

Lagre

2 comments

  • I really loved Eldorado, but very quickly developed a genuine soft spot for Nabo.
    I think they eloquently managed to bridge from one to the next – and both kitchens are magnificent.
    And where I miss Eldorado’s vibrancy, I simply adore the friendly, cozy “hygge” atmosphere they have created at Nabo.

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